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Overview

Updated on December 30, 2016

Issue

Providing person-centred care differs from delivery of the traditional medical model of care. The person-centred model engages with residents to make them a partner in the delivery of care. Needs and preferences are taken into consideration and residents take an active role in decision-making and goal setting. The core principles of person-centred care are Dignity and Respect, Information Sharing, Participation, and Collaboration1. Providing care that actively involves residents and family members requires a shift in the culture of an organization. This requires buy-in from all levels of an organization and a long-term commitment to sustaining engagement efforts in the face of resource shortages2.



Call to Action

Long-term care facilities across Canada use a number of different survey tools to capture resident experience and feedback3. Improving the patient's experience has been found to influence the efficiency of care by reducing diagnostic tests and referrals 4. By utilizing the principles outlined by the Planetree and Picker Institute, long-term care facilities can influence their residents' experiences through improved communication, resident education, resident involvement, and healthcare provider education 1-2. The goal is to improve resident satisfaction with their care, and improve communication between care providers and residents.

  1. Frampton S, Guastella S, Brady C, Hale M, Horowitz S, Smith SB, Stone S. 2008. Patient-Centered Care Improvement Guide.

    Planetree / Picker Institute
    Available from: http://www.hqontario.ca/Portals/0/modals/qi/en/processmap_pdfs/tools/patient-centered%20care%20improvement%20guide.pdf

  2. Gil H, Guastella S, Kinsey J, Boudreau-Scott D, Lepore M, Henfey A, Krebs R, Walden PM. 2010. Long-Term Care Improvement Guide.

    Planetree / Picker Institute
    Available from: http://planetree.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/LTC%20Improvement%20Guide%20For%20Download.pdf

  3. Patient-Reported Experience Measures: Long-Term Care.

    Canadian Institute for Health Information
    Available from: https://www.cihi.ca/sites/default/files/document/patient_reportedexpmeasuresltc-en_web.pdf

  4. Stewart M, Brown JB, Donner A, McWhinney IR, Oates J, Weston WW, Jordan J. 2000. The Impact of Patient-Centered Care on Outcomes

    J Fam Pract. 2000 September;49(9):796-804

Best Practices

Updated on December 30, 2016

“Insanity is doing things the way we’ve always done them and expecting different results”
Albert Einstein

Evidence-informed best practices are based on quality evidence and should be implemented into practice to optimize outcomes.7 Listed below you will find best practices graded according to the type of evidence. To view a description of the types of evidence, click here.

To help you move from best evidence to best practice, click on the + button next to each best practice to find details on how to implement, as well as change ideas to test using a PDSA approach. 

Change ideas are specific and practical changes by experience and research that focus on improving specific aspects of a system, process or behaviour. To learn more about change ideas see QI: Getting Started on the left menu bar.

  1. Frampton S, Guastella S, Brady C, Hale M, Horowitz S, Smith SB, Stone S. 2008. Patient-Centered Care Improvement Guide.

    Planetree / Picker Institute
    Available from: http://www.hqontario.ca/Portals/0/modals/qi/en/processmap_pdfs/tools/patient-centered%20care%20improvement%20guide.pdf

  2. Gil H, Guastella S, Kinsey J, Boudreau-Scott D, Lepore M, Henfey A, Krebs R, Walden PM. 2010. Long-Term Care Improvement Guide.

    Planetree / Picker Institute
    Available from: http://planetree.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/LTC%20Improvement%20Guide%20For%20Download.pdf

  3. Patient-Reported Experience Measures: Long-Term Care.

    Canadian Institute for Health Information
    Available from: https://www.cihi.ca/sites/default/files/document/patient_reportedexpmeasuresltc-en_web.pdf

  4. Stewart M, Brown JB, Donner A, McWhinney IR, Oates J, Weston WW, Jordan J. 2000. The Impact of Patient-Centered Care on Outcomes

    J Fam Pract. 2000 September;49(9):796-804

Measurement

Updated on December 30, 2016

Type of Indicator Indicator of Quality Improvement How to Calculate Targets/ Benchmarks How is This Indicator Used?
Outcome The percentage of residents who responded positively to the question/statement: Would you recommend this nursing home to others? / I would recommend this site or organization to others. See HQO's Indicator Library Targets: As high as possible (set by individual homes)


Provincial benchmarks: not available
QIP Priority Indicator
Having a voice: The percentage of residents who responded positively to the question: What number would you use to rate how well the staff listen to you? See HQO's Indicator Library QIP Priority Indicator
Being able to speak up about the home: The percentage of residents who responded positively to the following: I can express my opinion without fear of consequences See HQO's Indicator Library

QIP Priority Indicator

Tools & Resources

Updated on December 30, 2016

Tools

QI Tools

For a more comprehensive list of tools and resources, visit the following links on our HQO website:

 

Resources

Resident-Centred Care
QI Resources